अंग्रेज़ी

Posted Date : 19-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Money - Anything that is generally accepted as a medium of exchange with which to buy goods and services, a good that can be used to buy all other goods and services, that serves as a standard of value, and has a store of value.  

    Natural resources - "Gifts of nature" that are used to produce goods and services.  They include land, trees, fish, petroleum and mineral deposits, the fertility of soil, climatic conditions for growing crops, and so on. 

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Rubber: (vulcanization process) Charles Goodyear, U.S., 1839.
    Steamship: Claude de Jouffroy d'Abbans, France, 1783; James Rumsey, U.S., 1787; John Fitch, U.S., 1790; (high-pressure) Oliver Evans, U.S., 1804. All preceded Robert Fulton, U.S., 1807, credited with launching first commercially successful steamship.
    Tape recorder: (magnetic steel tape) Valdemar Poulsen, Denmark, 1899.

     

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    no time like the present
     now is the best time to do something We are very busy but there is no time like the present so we will go to the movie as planned. 
    one good turn deserves another
    a good deed or doing a good thing should be repaid with another good deed or by doing anot er good thing One good turn deserves another and I was quick to help my friend after he helped me. 
    penny wise and pound foolish
    to be careful with small amounts of money but to waste large amounts of money on unnece sary things The woman was penny wise and pound foolish and would hesitate to spend money on fruits and vegetables for her family but would buy very expensive desserts. 

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Jumbrella : Blend of 'jumbo' and 'umbrella'. Very large umbrella set above tables outdoors at a coffee shop, pub or restaurant.
    Landline: A telephone connected to wires in a fixed location as opposed to  a mobile or cell phone.

    Tongue Twister

    The winkle ship sank and the shrimp ship swam.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 18-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Exports - Goods or services produced in one nation but sold to buyers in another nation. 
    Fiscal policy - A government's program with respect to (1) the purchase of goods and services and spending on transfer payments, and (2) the amount and type of taxes.  
    Income - The payments made for the use of borrowed or loaned money.  

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away
    Bitter end

    If you do something to the bitter end, you do it to the very end, no matter how unsuccessful you are.
    Bitter pill to swallow
    A bitter pill to swallow is something that is hard to accept.
    Cross to bear
    If someone has a cross to bear, they have a heavy burden of responsibility or a problem that they alone must cope with.
    Crossing the Rubicon
    When you are crossing the Rubicon, you are passing a point of no return. After you do this thing, there is no way of turning around. The only way left is forward.
    Don't hold your breath
    If you are told not to hold your breath, it means that you shouldn't have high expectations about something.

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Glass cliff : Refers to a situation where women are selected for positions when there is a strong likelihood of failure.
    Netpicker : A person who surfs the internet looking for information in order to impress others with their knowledge of current events.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Conservation of electric charge: (the total electric charge of the universe or any closed system is constant) Benjamin Franklin, U.S., 1751-1754.
    Contagion theory: (infectious diseases caused by living agent transmitted from person to person) Girolamo Fracastoro, Italy, 1546.

    Tongue Twister
    Big boxes of bears being brought aboard.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 17-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Goods - Objects that can satisfy people's wants.  
    Human capital - The health, strength, education, training, and skills which people bring to their jobs.  
    Imports - Goods or services bought from sellers in another nation.

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    live high off the hog
     to live in prosperous circumstances I have been living high off the hog since I got my new job with its high salary. 
    to the victor belong/go the spoils
    the winner of something achieves power over pe ple and property In ancient times a victory by an army usually meant that to the victor belong the spoils. 
    when in Rome do as the Romans do
    you should adjust your habits to match the cu toms of the people or place where you live The diplomat believed that when in Rome do as the Romans do and he made an effort to learn the language and the customs of the people where he lived and worked. 

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Onesie     : A one-piece garment for adults, rather like a baby's sleeping suit, usually made of soft material and worn for relaxing or sleeping.
    OH : Abbreviationn of 'other half', a person's wife, husband or partner.
    Textual harassment : Sending text messages to mobile phones which insult or abuse people.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Neutron-induced radiation: Enrico Fermi et al., Italy, 1934.
    Nitroglycerin: Ascanio Sobrero, Italy, 1846.
    Ohm's law: (relationship between strength of electric current, electromotive force, and circuit resistance) Georg S. Ohm, Germany, 1827.

    Tongue Twister

      A pleasant place to place a plaice is a place where a plaice is pleased to be placed.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 16-Sep-2018
  • Idiom
    fever pitch

    If a situation or feeling reaches fever pitch, it becomes very intense and exciting.
    Reaction to the affair has reached fever pitch all over the country.
    go belly up
    If a business or project goes belly up, it is unsuccessful or goes bankrupt.
    The restaurant went belly up before the end of the first year.
    hard of hearing
    If someone is hard of hearing, they can't hear very well.
    You'll have to speak louder to Mr. Jones.  He's a bit hard of hearing.
    jump on bandwagon
    If a person or organization jumps on the bandwagon, they decide to do something when it is already successful or fashionable.
    When organic food became popular, certain stores were quick to jump on the bandwagon and promote it.
     Phrasal Verbs
    A phrasal verb is a verb followed by a preposition or an adverb; the combination creates a meaning different from the original verb. Below you will find a list of phrasal verbs in alphabetical order with their meaning and an example of use.
    answer to- Be responsible to/be controlled by (someone)    
    boot up - Start a computer by loading an operating system or program.    
    Just give me a few minutes to boot up the computer.

    Common Mistakes and 
    Confusing Words in English
    curious / interesting
    If someone is curious it means they are interested in learning about what is around them.
    For example: "Lynne was curious to find out how many people used the website."
    If something is curious, it means it's odd, strange or unusual.
    For example: "The results were very curious because a lot of Americans were using the website."
    If someone or something is interesting it means it gets your attention because it may be unusual, exciting, or has a lot of ideas
    For example: "She found the results very interesting."
    So, something curious can be interesting, but something interesting isn't necessarily curious.
    Simile
     a figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid e.g. as brave as a lion  ‘as black as coal’, ‘as white as snow’.
     * As drunk as a lord 
    * As easy as pie 
    * As easy as falling off a log 
     * As safe as houses 
    * As sick as a dog 

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Posted Date : 15-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Private goods - A commodity that benefits the individual.  An example is bread, which, if consumed by one person, cannot be consumed by another person.
    Surplus - The situation resulting when the quantity supplied exceeds the quantity demanded of a good or service, usually because the price is for some reason below the equilibrium price in the market.

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    better to be a live dog than a dead lion
     it is better to be a live coward than a dead hero (this is from Ecclesiastes in the Bible) It is better to be a live dog than a dead lion so I walked away and did not try and fight with the man. 
    cross a bridge when you come to it
     face a problem or challenge when you come to it or when it arises I do not know what I will do if I cannot rent a car on my trip. I will cross that bridge when I come to it. 
    different strokes for different folks
    - everyone has different interests and tastes
    The man loves to read all night and sleep all day. It is different strokes for different folks. 
    live and let live
     to be tolerant and accept other people who may be different People in a large city must live and let live. 

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Cells: (word used to describe microscopic examination of cork) Robert Hooke, England, 1665; (theory: cells are common structural and functional unit of all living organisms) Theodor Schwann, Matthias Schleiden, 1838-1839.

    Disease: (chemicals in treatment of) crusaded by Philippus Paracelsus, 1527-1541; (germ theory) Louis Pasteur, France, 1862-1877.

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Cot potato : Very young child who spends a lot of time watching television. (cot = a baby's bed)
    Flexitarian : A vegetarian who sometimes eats meat or fish.

    Tongue Twister
    The crafty cat crept into the crypt. (repeat)
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 14-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Human resources - The quantity and quality of human effort directed toward producing goods and services (also called labor). 
    Incentives - Factors that motivate and influence the behavior of households and businesses.  Prices, profits, and losses act as incentives for participants to take action in a market economy. 
    Loss - Business situation in which total cost of production exceeds total revenue; negative profit. 

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away

    Break the ice
    When you break the ice, you get over any initial embarrassment or shyness when you meet someone for the first time and start conversing.
    Bright as a button
    A person who is as bright as a button is very intelligent or smart.
    Couch potato
    A couch potato is an extremely idle or lazy person who chooses to spend most of their leisure time horizontal in front of the TV and eats a diet that is mainly junk food.
    Could eat a horse
    If you are very hungry, you could eat a horse.
    Down in the doldrums
    If somebody's down in the doldrums, they are depressed and lacking energy.

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Guesstimate : Blend of 'guess' and 'estimate'. A rough estimate without any claim of accuracy.
    Netiquette : Blend of 'network' and 'etiquette'. Set of rules governing appropriate behaviour and courtesy on the internet.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud, Austria, c.1904.
    Pulsars: Antony Hewish and Jocelyn Bell Burnel, England, 1967.
    Teflon: DuPont, U.S., 1943.

    Tongue Twister
    Twenty tongue tying tongue twisters to twist your tongue a ton.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 13-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Distribution - The manner in which total output and income is distributed among individuals or factors (e.g., the distribution of income between labor and capital).  
    Earn - Receive payment (income) for productive efforts. 
    Gross domestic product (GDP), real - GDP corrected for inflation.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Autopilot: (for aircraft) Elmer A. Sperry, U.S., c.1910, first successful test, 1912, in a Curtiss flying boat.
    Avogadro's law: (equal volumes of all gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal number of molecules) Amedeo Avogadro, Italy, 1811.

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    better the devil you know than the devil you don't
     it may be better to endure a situation that you are accustomed to than to risk a change for something that may be worse My friend wanted to change banks but he felt that it was better the devil he knew than the devil he didn't so he stayed with his old bank. 
    children and fools speak the truth
    children and fools say things without knowing or thinking what they mean but often what they say is true The child said that the woman was very fat. This was true. Children and fools speak the truth. 
    different strokes for different folks
    everyone has different interests and tastes The man loves to read all night and sleep all day. It is different strokes for different folks. 
    early to bed, early to rise makes one healthy, wealthy and wise
    going to bed early is good for you Early to bed, early to rise makes one healthy, wealthy and wise was the advice that my grandmother gave me. 

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Overparenting:  Being excessively protective of one's children in order to guarantee their safety and ensure their success in life.
    Staycation : A vacation in which you stay at home and relax or visit places close to where you live.

    Tongue Twister

    The big fat cat sat on the rat.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

     

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Posted Date : 12-Sep-2018
  • General Medical Experts
    There are different types of doctors who treat various medical conditions according to their specialization.
    Stomach/Bowel/Liver/Kidney/Colon
    Hepatologist ~ Studies and treats diseases that affect the liver.
    Pediatric Hepatologist ~ Studies and treats chronic and congenial diseases of liver in children.
    Nephrologist ~ Studies, diagnoses and treats kidney diseases and ailments.

    Economics Terminology  

    Revenue - Payments received by businesses from selling goods and services. 
    Standard of living - A minimum of necessities, comforts, or luxuries held essential to maintaining a person or group in customary or proper status or circumstances.  
    Total cost - Cost of resources used in producing a product multiplied by the quantity produced.  

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 
    all is fair in love and war

    anything that you do in love or in war can beexcused All is fair in love and war the man thought when he asked his colleague for a date. 
    Bend someone's ear
    To bend someone's ear is to talk to someone about something for a long-enough period that it becomes tiresome for the listener.

    Chalk and cheese
    Things, or people, that are like chalk and cheese are very different and have nothing in common.
    Dutch treat
    If something like a meal is a Dutch treat, then each person pays their own share of the bill.
    Eat like a horse
    Someone who eats like a horse, eats a lot.

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Freemale : A woman who is happy to stay single and independent so that she can do what she wants when she wants.
    Glass cliff: Refers to a situation where women are selected for positions when there is a strong likelihood of failure.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS
    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    hedonism    belief that pleasure is the 
            highest good
    organicism    conception of life or society as         an organism
    personalism    doctrine that humans possess     spiritual freedom

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Measles vaccine: John F. Enders, Thomas Peebles, U.S., 1953.
    Pen: (fountain) Lewis E. Waterman, U.S., 1884; (ball-point, for marking on rough surfaces) John H. Loud, U.S., 1888; (ball-point, for handwriting) Lazlo Biro, Argentina, 1944.

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Posted Date : 11-Sep-2018
  • Idiom
    live beyond means

    If someone lives beyond their means, they spend more money than they earn or can afford.
    The cost of living was so much higher in New York that he was soon living beyond his means.
    once in a blue moon
    Something that happens once in a blue moon happens rarely or hardly ever.
    She doesn't contact us very often.  We hear from her once in a blue moon!

     Phrasal Verbs
    A phrasal verb is a verb followed by a preposition or an adverb; the combination creates a meaning different from the original verb. Below you will find a list of phrasal verbs in alphabetical order with their meaning and an example of use.
    log in/on- Access a program or database using a password.
    You need to log in to your account before you use the services.

     

    Common Mistakes and 
    Confusing Words in English
    been / gone
    been is the past participle of be
    gone is the past participle of go
    Been can be used to describe completed journeys. So if you have been to England twice, you have travelled there and back twice.
    For example: I've been to Africa, but I've never been to Asia.
    If you have gone to England, you have not yet returned.
    For example: I've gone to the bank. I should be back in half an hour.
     Now you've been and gone and done it!

    NEW WORDS IN ENGLISH
    Anklington- Blend of the words 'ankle' and 'wellington'. A short wellington boot.
    Captcha- Completely Automated Public Turing Test To Tell Computers and Humans Apart. A distorted image of letters and numbers used to ensure that a response is not generated by a computer, in order  to prevent spamming.

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Posted Date : 10-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    National income - The amount of aggregate income earned by suppliers of resources employed to produce GNP; net national product plus government subsidies minus indirect business taxes.  
    Opportunity cost - The next best alternative that must be given up when a choice is made. 
    Physical capital - Manufactured items used to produce goods and services. 

    Vocabulary

    jaunty - (adj.) lively, easy, and carefree in manner; smart or trim in appearance
    Synonyms: unconcerned, lighthearted
    Antonyms: downcast, dejected, glum

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away

    Big time
    This can be used to with the meaning 'very much'- if you like something big time, you like it a lot.
    Bird's eye view
    If you have a bird's eye view of something, you can see it perfectly clearly.
    Cloud of suspicion
    If a cloud of suspicion hangs over an individual, it means that they are not believed or are distrusted.
    Cloud on the horizon
    If you can see a problem ahead, you can call it a cloud on the horizon.
    Down to the wire
    (USA) If something goes down to the wire, like a competition, then it goes to the very last moment before it is clearwho has won.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Radioactivity: (X-rays) Wilhelm K. Roentgen, Germany, 1895; (radioactivity of uranium) Henri Becquerel, France, 1896; (radioactive elements, radium and polonium in uranium ore) Marie Sklodowska-Curie, Pierre Curie, France, 1898; (classification of alpha and beta particle radiation) Pierre Curie, France, 1900; (gamma radiation) Paul-Ulrich Villard, France, 1900.
    Radiocarbon dating, carbon-14 method: (discovered) Willard F. Libby, U.S., 1947; (first demonstrated) U.S., 1950.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    constructivism    belief that knowledge and         reality do not have an                     objec tive value
    perfectionism    doctrine that moral perfection             constitutes the highest value

    Tongue Twister
    Send toast to ten tense stout 
    saints’ ten tall tents.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 09-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Investment in capital resources - Business purchases of new plant and equipment.  
    Law of demand - The principle that price and quantity demanded are inversely related.  
    Money market - A term denoting the set of institutions that handle the purchase or sale of short-term credit instruments like Treasury bills and commercial paper.

    Vocabulary
    exotic - (adj.) foreign; charmingly unfamiliar or strikingly unusual
      Synonyms: strange, alien, picturesque, colorful
    Antonyms: native, indigenous, familiar, commonplace

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    curiosity killed the cat
    asking questions or being curious about som thing that is not your business is often not a good thing "Curiosity killed the cat," the mother said as the child asked questions about her birthday party. 
    don't look a gift horse in the mouth
    do not criticize a gift that you receive The little girl did not like the present from her aunt but her mother told her not to look a gift horse in the mouth. 
    enough is as good as a feast
    what you have or have done should be sati factory or enough Enough is as good as a feast and having just enough can be as good as having much of something. 
    first time for everything
    just because something has not been done or happened before does not mean that it will never happen There is a first time for everything and the man recently decided to try skydiving. 

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Ringtone : The sound made by a mobile or cell phone to indicate an incoming call.
    Sandwich generation : A generation of people who care for the needs of their children as well as those of their own elderly parents.
    Tweetheart : A user of the Twitter service who is very popular or admired, or with whom other users communicate a lot.

    Tongue Twister
    Violet Violins Sound Very Vivid 
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 08-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Division of labor -  The process whereby workers perform only a single or a very few steps of a major production task (as when working on an assembly line.)
    Exchange - Trading goods and services with others  for other goods and services or for money (also called trade).  When people exchange voluntarily, they expect to be better off as a result. 
    Factors of production -  Resources used by businesses to produce goods and services.  

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 
    Brownie points

    If you try to earn Brownie points with someone, you do things you know will please them.
    Cold shoulder
    If you give or show someone the cold shoulder, you are deliberately unfriendly and unco-operative towards them.
    Down the hatch
    This idiom can be said before drinking alcohol in company.
    Easy as ABC
    Something that is as easy as ABC is very easy or simple.
    Face like thunder
    If someone has a face like thunder, they are clearly very angry or upset about something.

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Tweet seats : Seats in a theatre or concert hall given to people who wish to tweet during the performance.
    Videophile : Person who is very interested in watching videos and making recordings, and values high-quality results.
    Widget     : Blend of 'window' and 'gadget'. A small application or tool that can be installed and executed within a web page.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS
    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    functionalism    doctrine emphasising utility and         function
    tychism    theory     that accepts role of pure chance
    zootheism    attribution of divine qualities to         animals

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Periodic law: (that properties of elements are functions of their atomic weights) Dmitri Mendeleev, Russia, 1869.
    Periodic table:
    (arrangement of chemical elements based on periodic law) Dmitri Mendeleev, Russia, 1869.

    Tongue Twister
      If big black bats could blow bubbles, how big of bubbles would big black bats blow ?
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 07-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Public goods - A commodity whose benefits are indivisibly spread among the entire community, whether or not particular individuals desire to consume the public good.  For example, a public-health measure that eradicates smallpox protects all, not just those paying for the vaccinations.  These goods are often provided by the government.

    Vocabulary

    belittle - (v.) to make something appear smaller than it is; to refer to in a way that suggests lack of importance or value
    Synonyms: minimize, underrate, disparage
    Antonyms: exaggerate, magnify, overestimate

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    no time like the present
     now is the best time to do something We are very busy but there is no time like the present so we will go to the movie as planned. 
    one good turn deserves another
    a good deed or doing a good thing should be repaid with another good deed or by doing anot er good thing One good turn deserves another and I was quick to help my friend after he helped me. 
    penny wise and pound foolish
    to be careful with small amounts of money but to waste large amounts of money on unnece sary things The woman was penny wise and pound foolish and would hesitate to spend money on fruits and vegetables for her family but would buy very expensive desserts. 
    time flies
     time seems to pass very quickly Time flies and before we had a chance to enjoy the summer it was already autumn. 

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Chillaxing : Blend of 'chilling' and relaxing'. 

    E-waste : Electronic material and devices that have been thrown away.
    Fashionista : Person who dresses according to the latest fashion trends.
    Gastrosexuals    A new generation of men who see cooking more as a hobby than.

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Posted Date : 06-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Government - National, state and local agencies that use tax revenues to provide goods and services for their citizens.  
    Households - Individuals and family units which, as consumers, buy goods and services from firms and, as resource owners, sell or rent productive resources to business firms.  

    Vocabulary

    fervent - (adj.) very earnest, emotional, passionate; extremely hot
    Synonyms: enthusiastic, ardent, burning, blazing, scorching.
    Antonyms: blasé, apathetic, restrained, emotionless

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Snail mail : The standard system of delivering mail which is very slow in contrast to electronic mail.

    Wordle:The words of a piece of text arranged into a sort of graphic. The more frequent a particular word appears in the text, the bigger its size in the wordle. (Also called 'word cloud' or 'text cloud'.)

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Ice age theory: Louis Agassiz, Swiss-American, 1840.
    Induction, electric: Joseph Henry, U.S., 1828.
    Neutron: James Chadwick, England, 1932.
    Prozac: (antidepressant fluoxetine) Bryan B. Malloy, Scotland, and Klaus K. Schmiegel, U.S., 1972; (released for use in U.S.) Eli Lilly & Company, 1987

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 
    Break the back of the beast
    If you break the back of the beast, you accomplish a challenge.
    Confirmed bachelor
    A confirmed bachelor is a man who shows little or no interest in women.  It can be used to  suggest  that they're gay.
    Constitution of an ox
    If someone has the constitution of an ox, they are less affected than most people by things like tiredness, illness, alcohol, etc.
    Draw the line
    When you draw the line, you set out limits of what you find acceptable, beyond which you will not go.
    Draw the shortest straw
    If someone draws the shortest straw, they lose or are chosen to do something unpleasant.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS
    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    regalism    doctrine of the monarch's             supremacy in church affairs
    synergism    belief that human will and divine         spirit cooperate in salvation
    voluntarism    belief that the will dominates the         intellect

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Posted Date : 04-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology
    Non-price determinants of supply - The factors that influence the amount a producer will supply of a product at each possible price.  The non-price determinants of supply are the factors that can change the entire supply schedule and curve.  

    Profit - The difference between total revenues and the full costs involved in producing or selling a good or service; it is a return for risk taking.  

    Quota - A legal limit on the quantity of a particular product that can be imported or exported.  

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    monadism    theory that there exist ultimate         units of being
    naturalism    belief that the world can be             explained in terms of natural         forces
    objectivism    doctrine that all reality is objec        tive
    paedobaptism    doctrine of infant baptism

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away

    Bird-brain
    Someone who has a bird-brain, or is bird-brained, is stupid.
    Bite the bullet
    If you have to bite the bullet, you have to accept or face something unpleasant because it cannot be avoided.
    Close the book
    If you close the book on something, you end it completely.
    Cloth ears
    If you don't listen to people, they may suggest you have cloth ears.
    Discerning eye
    If a person has a discerning eye, they are particularly good at judging the quality of something.
    Dog days
    Dog days are very hot summer days.

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Citizen journalism :  News collected and reported by ordinary people, especially through the use of blog software.
    E-stalk : To stalk (follow) someone using Internet searches and email.
    Face Time: Application which enables people to make video phone calls. They can speak and see each other at the same time.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Helium first observed on sun: Sir Joseph Lockyer, England, 1868.
    Heredity, laws of: Gregor Mendel, Austria, 1865.
    Holograph: Dennis Gabor, England, 1947.Home videotape systems (VCR): (Betamax) Sony, Japan, 1975; (VHS) Matsushita, Japan, 1975.

    Tongue Twister

    Fresh fried fish, Fish fresh fried, Fried fish fresh, Fish fried fresh.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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Posted Date : 03-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology
    Money - Anything that is generally accepted as a medium of exchange with which to buy goods and services, a good that can be used to buy all other goods and services, that serves as a standard of value, and has a store of value.
    Natural resources - "Gifts of nature" that are used to produce goods and services.  They include land, trees, fish, petroleum and mineral deposits, the fertility of soil, climatic conditions for growing crops, and so on.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS
    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    geocentrism    belief that Earth is the centre         of the universe
    hedonism    belief that pleasure is the high        est good
    immanentism    belief in an immanent or per            manent god
    kenotism    doctrine that Christ rid himself         of divinity in becoming human

    PROVERBS

    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    once bitten, twice shy
    if something goes wrong one time then you will be careful about doing the same thing again Once bitten, twice shy and after the woman lost much money on the stock market she did not want to invest money there again. 
    a penny saved is a penny earned
     money saved through spending wisely is just as valuable as the money that you earn by working A penny saved is a penny earned and it is just as important to be careful spending money as it is to earn money. 
    the road to hell is paved with good intentions
    you may have good intentions but if you do not put them into practice you will achieve bad results The man wanted to be successful at his new job but the road to hell is paved with good intentions. He was always late and he was fired from the job. 

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
     Applepick : Steal someone's iPhone.
    Chick lit : Books, usually featuring female characters, written by women on contemporary themes and issues that appeal more to women than to men.
    EV : Electric vehicle, a vehicle which runs entirely on electricity stored in rechargeable batteries.

    Increase Your Vocabulary 

    Newspaper 
    "     advertisement
    "    advice column
    "    back page
    "    cartoon
    "    circulation
    "    columnist
    "    comics
    "    correspondent
    "    editor
    "    editorial
    "    evening edition
    "    extra
    "    feature
    "    front page
    "    headline
    "    interviewer
    "    lead story
    "    morning edition
    "    newspaper office
    "    newsprint
    "    newsstand
    "    obituary
    "    photographer
    "    reporter
    "    tabloid
    "    TV guide

    Tongue Twister
    Who’s taking care of the caretakers daughter when the caretakers busy taking care?
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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Posted Date : 02-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology
    Investment in human capital - An action taken to increase the productivity of workers.  These actions can include improving skills and abilities, education, health, or mobility of workers. 
       
    Land - Natural resources or gifts of nature that are used to produce goods and services.  

    Medium of exchange - One of the functions of money whereby people exchange goods and services for money and in turn use money to obtain other goods and services. 

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS
    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    adevism    denial of gods of mythology             and legend
    conservatism    belief in maintaining political         and social traditions
    eudaemonism    ethical belief that happiness             equals morality
    fideism        doctrine that knowledge             depends on faith over reason

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 
    Blood from a turnip

    It is impossible to get something from someone if they don't have it, just as you cannot get blood from a turnip.
    Blood is thicker than water
    This idiom means that family relationships are stronger than others.
    Climb the greasy pole
    Advance within an organisation - especially in politics.
    Cling to hope
    If people cling to hope, they continue to hope though the chances of success are very small.
    Do the needful
    (India) If you do the needful, you do what is necessary.
    Do the trick
    If something does the trick, it is was is needed or has the necessary effect.

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
     Spinnish : The language used by spin doctors, spokes-persons, campaign managers, etc. when trying to present information in a favourable light.
    Tribal marketing : Marketing strategy which consists in using the social behaviour of certain groups ('tribes') of consumers (e.g. surfers, rappers) to promote a product or service. Very often used by clothing and accessory brands.

    Tongue Twister
    Excited executioner exercising his excising powers excessively.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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Posted Date : 01-Sep-2018
  • Economics Terminology
    Bank, commercial 
     A financial institution accepts checking deposits, holds savings, sells traveler's checks and performs other financial services.  
    Entrepreneurship - The human resource that assumes the risk of organizing other productive resources to produce goods and services.  

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS
    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    indifferentism    the belief that all religions     are equally valid.
    kathenotheism    polytheism in which each     god is considered single     and supreme
    legalism    belief that salvation         depends on strict adher        ence to the law
    mentalism    belief that the world can         be explained as aspect of     the mind

    Vocabulary
    predominant - (adj.) the greatest in strength or power; most common
    Synonyms: chief, major, paramount, prevalent
    Antonyms: secondary, minor, subsidiary, rare

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Plate tectonics: Alfred Wegener, Germany, 1912-1915.
    Plow, forked: Mesopotamia, before 3000 B.C.
    Plutonium, synthesis of: Glenn T. Seaborg, Edwin M. McMillan, Arthur C. Wahl, Joseph W. Kennedy, U.S., 1941.

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    all's well that ends well
    - if things are good at the end of some situation then we should be satisfied with these results (from Shakespeare's play All's Well That Ends Well) All's well that ends well and although the storm was very bad the children arrived home safely.
    better safe than sorry
     it is better to be careful than to take a chance and risk an accident or illness or a failure which you may regret It is better to be safe than sorry and I always bring my umbrella to work when it is a cloudy day. 
    children should be seen and not heard
    children should be quiet The woman believed that children should be seen and not heard. Maybe for this reason her children were always very quiet. 

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
      Funemployment : A blend of 'fun' and 'unemployed'. Someone who enjoys not having a job because they have more time for leisure and fun activities.
    Gastropub : A pub which, in addition to beer and alcoholic drinks, offers gastronomic cuisine.

    Tongue Twister
    Never work before breakfast; if you have to work before breakfast, eat your breakfast first.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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