अंग्रेज़ी

Posted Date : 22-Jul-2018
  • FUN FACTS ABOUT HUMAN BODY
    The human body is an incredibly complex and intricate system and it still baffles researchers regularly despite thousands of years of medical knowledge. As a result, it shouldn't be a surprise that even body parts we deal with everyday have unexpected facts and explanations behind them.
    The largest cell in the body is the female egg and the smallest is the male sperm.
     During your lifetime, you will produce enough saliva to fill two swimming pools.
     Babies are always born with blue eyes. The melanin in their eyes needs time to be fully deposited or to be darkened by ultraviolet light to reveal the baby's true eye color.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system. 
    pluralism    belief that reality con                sists of several kinds or 
            entities
    polytheism    belief in multiple deities
    positivism    doctrine that that which is not         observable is not knowable
    pragmatism    doctrine emphasizing practi            cal value of philosophy

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Radiocarbon dating, carbon-14 method: (discovered) Willard F. Libby, U.S., 1947; (first demonstrated) U.S., 1950.
    Radio signals, extraterrestrial: first known radio noise signals were received by U.S. engineer, Karl Jansky, originating from the Galactic Center, 1931.

    Economics Terminology 

    Supply - A schedule of how much producers are willing and able to sell at all possible prices during some time period.  
    Supply decrease - A decrease in the quantity supplied at every price; a shift to the left of the supply curve.  

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 

    Benjamin of the family
    The Benjamin of the family is the youngest child.
    Beside themselves
    If people are beside themselves, they are very worried or emotional about something. 
    Climb on the bandwagon
    When people climb on the bandwagon they do something because it is popular and everyone else is doing it.
    Draw a line in the sand
    If you draw a line in the sand, you establish a limit beyond which things will be unacceptable.
    Each to their own
    Different people have different preferences. In American English, 'Each to his own' is more common.

    INTERESTING PHRASES

     to try on- to put on a piece of clothing in order to see how it looks and whether it fits
    What a lovely dress! Why don't you try it on?
     to dress up - to put on clothes that make you look like someone else, for fun,to put on clothes that are more formal than the clothes you usually  wear
    All children love dressing up.
    dress up as: They had dressed up as princes and princesses.

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Copyleft : Opposite of copyright. Whereas copyright imposes restrictions on the distribution of a work or publication, copyleft eliminates restrictions and allows freedom of use for all.

    Tongue Twister

    Red lorry, yellow lorry.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 21-Jul-2018
  • FUN FACTS ABOUT HUMAN BODY
    The human body is an incredibly complex and intricate system and it still baffles researchers regularly despite thousands of years of medical knowledge. As a result, it shouldn't be a surprise that even body parts we deal with everyday have unexpected facts and explanations behind them.
     Men burn fat faster than women by a rate of about 50 calories a day.
     Men get hiccups more often than women.
     A man has approximately 6.8 litres of blood in the body while women have approximately 5 litres.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) Library of Congress
    Electrocardiography: Demonstrated by Augustus Waller, Switzerland, 1887; (first pra tical device for recording activity of heart) Willem Einthoven, 1903, Netherlands.
    Electromagnet:  William Sturgeon, England, 1823.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    psilanthropism        denial of Christ's                 divinity
    psychism        belief in universal soul
    psychomorphism    doctrine that inani                mate objects have                 human mentality

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Cyberchondriac A person who imagines that he/she is suffering from an illness after reading about the symptoms on the Internet!

    PROVERBS

    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    It takes two to make a quarrel
    Both parties in a quarrel should share the blame or take responsibility for it; no one can start a quarrel all by himself.
    Speech is silver, silence is golden
    Talk may be beneficial, but sometimes acquiescence may be the best option to take.
    To err is human, to forgive divine
     It is only normal for man to make mistakes and do wrong, but for one to forgive another for his wrong is indeed  great and gracious act.
    When in Rome do as the Romans do
    When one is in a new place, country or situation he must adapt himself to the new manners and customs.
    What's done can't be undone
     In life there are some things once done or decisions once made cannot be changed; malicious words once uttered or harmful actions once done cannot be taken back.

    Economics Terminology  

    Non-price determinants of supply - The factors that influence the amount a producer will supply of a product at each possible price.  The non-price determinants of supply are the factors that can change the entire supply schedule and curve.  
    Opportunity cost - The next best alternative that must be given up when a choice is made. 
    Physical capital - Manufactured items used to produce goods and services.  

    Tongue Twister

     Joe told a joke he wrote on his own. 
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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Posted Date : 20-Jul-2018
  • -  Dinesh Akula

    Sometime in August 2003 few months before assembly elections in Chhattisgarh - the then Finance Minister of the State Ramchandra Singh Deo called me home for lunch. Fish was the strong bond between us. He spent a good time in Kolkata, and so did I. Hence the language and food became a common factor. After lunch, he picked up a collection of photographs which he shot during his younger days. “Do you know this was actor Nargis when she was just 17,” he showed me a black and white portrait of Sanjay Dutt’s mother and proudly revealed that he presented a copy to Sunil Dutt who was surprised to see the photograph. Dr Singhdeo worked closely with the legendary Satyajit Ray as still photographer.
    Hailing for the royal Koriya (Baikunthpur) family - he never got into marital status. “I was busy with life so never thought of marriage,” he told me once and added that he had a few likings, but he never revealed those to me.
    His palace one of the biggest after Gwalior Palace in unified Madhya Pradesh had the biggest collection of trophies.  On September 2003 the former minister gave me a personal tour of his marvellous palace recollecting his childhood days and his father’s time as the ruler.
    Singhdeo was a person who never forgot to bring up his father’s name 2-3 times in daily conversation.  “Do you know my father was the first person to implement labour law in the region,” he said as his eye glittered with happiness.
    Ramchandra Singhdeo was first finance minister in the Ajit Jogi government and was known for his strict fiscal management and honesty. In his 2003 election-year budget, he refused to dole out populist and freebie schemes. After the party lost 2003 polls, some of the party leaders blamed that his policies were responsible for the Congress defeat.
    Born on February 13, 1930, at Baikuntpur, he completed his master’s degree in science and later went on to take a doctorate degree (PhD) in life science. He won his first polls in 1967 and then in 1990, 1993, 1998 and 2003 from Baikunthpur. In 1990, he had contested as an independent and won by an impressive margin.
    Singhdeo bowed out of contest during the 2008 elections, publicly declaring, “I can’t distribute arrack or money”. During this polls too, he said that he considered himself unfit in the scheme of things of current politics.
    Elected from Korea five times during undivided Madhya Pradesh, Singhdeo has been known for his bold stand on various issues including relief and rehabilitation of oustees of major dam projects in Madhya Pradesh and other social problems. People regard him as a leader, who understands the issues of the common man and is even willing to go against the party-line on issues concerning their welfare. He was a minister of water resources in Madhya Pradesh before the formation of Chhattisgarh.
    At a budget briefing in 2003, a journalist addressed him as “Maharaja”. Singhdeo immediately retorted “I am not a Maharaja. My father was a Maharaja, and I am an ordinary man.”
    Since two years I somehow lost touch with him. I regret. In the state secretariat, people used to call us uncle and nephew because of some unknown bond we had while I was a reporter for Hindustan Times and later Star News. Despite being so close, he never gave me any exclusive or breaking news. Once I asked him for some details on the budget. He said get out. I still have the titan watch he presented to me in 2002. I just had a look at the wristwatch its battery is dead speaking the fact that you have left us forever physically but your soul is with us. I miss you, sir. 

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 20-Jul-2018
  • FUN FACTS ABOUT HUMAN BODY
    The human body is an incredibly complex and intricate system and it still baffles researchers regularly despite thousands of years of medical knowledge. As a result, it shouldn't be a surprise that even body parts we deal with everyday have unexpected facts and explanations behind them.
    The brain is more active at night than during the day. Scientists don't know yet why this is.
    The higher your IQ, the more you dream.
    Facial hair grows faster than any other hair on the body.

    WORDS OF WISDOM

    Words with suffix 'sophy' and 'sopher' words have in common an etymological derivation from the Greek sophia, meaning 'wisdom'. They refer to an odd group of systems of knowledge and philosophical practices.
    pyrosophy    knowledge of the properties of fire
        rhabdology    knowledge or learning     concerning divining rods
    sciosophy    system of knowledge without basis     in science

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Baggravation    Blend of the words 'bag' and 'aggravation'. A feeling of annoyance and frustration at the airport when your baggage has not arrived but the other passengers' bags have.
    Blook    A blend of 'book' and 'blog' :  a book written by a blogger.

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 

    All over the map
    (USA) If something like a discussion is all over the map, it doesn't stick to the main topic and goes off on tangents.
    Beer and skittles
    (UK) People say that life is not all beer and skittles, meaning that it is not about self-indulgence and pleasure.
    Clean bill of health
    If something or someone has a clean bill of health, then there's nothing wrong; everything's fine.
    Duck to water
    If you take to something like a duck to water, you find when you start that you have a natural affinity for it.
    Foot in the door
    If you have or get your foot in the door, you start working in a company or organisation at a low level, hoping that you will be able to progress from there.

    SCIENTIFIC FACTS ABOUT HUMAN ORGANS APPENDIX TO LIFE

     The appendix gets a bad press. It is usually treated as a body part that lost its function millions of years ago. All it seems to do is occasionally get infected and cause appendicitis. Yet recently it has been discovered that the appendix is very useful to the bacteria that help your digestive system function. They use it to get respite from the strain of the frenzied activity of the gut, somewhere to breed and help keep the gut's bacterial inhabitants topped up. So treat your appendix with respect.

    Tongue Twister
    How can a clam cram in a clean cream can?
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 19-Jul-2018
  • Seven Measurements
    Here are 7 systems of measurement for things like time, distance and money.
    1. Time
    1000 milliseconds = 1 second (sec)
    60 seconds = 1 minute (min)
    60 minutes = 1 hour (hr)
    24 hours = 1 day
    7 days = 1 week (wk)
    28, 30 or 31 days = 1 month (mth)
    12 months = 1 year (yr)
    365 days = 1 year
    BUT every 4th year = 366 days (a leap year)
    Also note:
    52 weeks = 1 year (approximately)
    People often use the following terms:
    48 hours (2 days)
    72 hours (3 days)
    2. Distance
    There are two systems for measuring distance in the English-speaking world:
    a) metric
    10 millimetres (mm) = 1 centimetre (cm)
    100 centimetres = 1 metre (m)
    1000 metres = 1 kilometre (km)
    b) imperial/US
    12 inches (in) = 1 foot (ft)
    3 feet = 1 yard (yd) (approximately 1 metre)
    1760 yards = 1 mile (approximately 1.6 km)
    3. Area
    Area is the extent of a surface. It is 2-dimensional. Area is often expressed using the word "square" + the distance. For example, if a room is 10 metres long and 5 metres wide, it is 50 square metres (50 sq. m). But we can also use the distance + the figure 2. Then we would write 50m2.
    Here are two examples:
    My table is 3 metres long x 2 metres wide:
    area = 6 sq.m, or
    area = 6m2
    My town is 3 miles x 4 miles:
    area = 12 sq. miles
    We often measure the area of land using:
    hectare = 10,000 square metres
    acre = 4,840 square yards
    There is a difference between "square metres" and "metres square". If my room is 10 feet x 10 feet, it is 100 square feet but 10 feet square. We can only say this when the length and the width are the same.
    4. Volume
    Volume is the amount of space occupied by an object or enclosed in a container. It is 3-dimensional. Volume is often expressed using the word "cubic" + the distance. For example, if a room is 5 metres long, 3 metres wide and 3 metres high, it is 45 cubic metres (45 cu. m). But we can also use the distance + the figure 3. So we write 45m3.
    Other measurements of volume are:
    - 1000 cubic centimetres (cc) = 1 litre (L or l)
    - gallon (approx. 4.6 litres in UK, approx. 3.8 liters in US)
    We use litres to talk about fluids like drinks and petrol.
    We also use gallons to talk about petrol and other fluids.
    5. Speed
    Speed is a measurement that combines distance, quantity, volume etc AND time. Common ways of talking about the speed of a car, for example, are:
    - 50 miles per hour (50mph)
    - 50 kilometres per hour (50kph)
    We also use the symbol / when talking about speed:
    - 50 people/hour (50 people per hour)
    - 1000 l/hr (1000 litres per hour)
    6. Weight
    There are two systems to measure how heavy something is:
    a) metric
    1000 grams (g) = 1 kilogram (kg)
    1000 kilograms = 1 metric ton (metric tonne)
    b) imperial/US
    16 ounces (oz) = 1 pound (lb)
    14 pounds = 1 stone (British)
    100 pounds = 1 hundredweight (cwt)*
    20 hundredweights = 1 ton*
    *There is a slight difference between British and US hundreweights and tons.
    7. Money
    Most countries use a basic monetary unit (for example the dollar) divided into 100 fractional units (example cents). They use a combination of paper money (banknotes or notes) and metal money (coins).
    Here are some examples from the world's major currencies:
    USA: American Dollar (USD or $)
    1 dollar = 100 cents
    UK: British Pound (GBP or £)
    1 pound = 100 pence
    European Union: Euro (EUR or €)
    1 euro = 100 cents
    Japan: Japanese Yen (JPY or ¥)
    1 yen = 100 sen (not used today)
    Switzerland: Swiss Franc (CHF)
    1 franc = 100 centimes

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 18-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    National debt - The net accumulation of federal budget deficits.  
    National income - The amount of aggregate income earned by suppliers of resources employed to produce GNP; net national product plus government subsidies minus indirect business taxes.  
    Natural resources - "Gifts of nature" that are used to produce goods and services.  They include land, trees, fish, petroleum and mineral deposits, the fertility of soil, climatic conditions for growing crops, and so on.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Photovoltaic effect: (light falling on certain materials can produce electricity) Edmund Becquerel, France, 1839.
    Piano: (Hammerklavier) Bartolommeo Cristofori, Italy, 1709; (pianoforte with su tai ing and damper pedals) John Broadwood, England, 1873.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    quietism    doctrine of enlightenment             through mental tranquility
    syndicalism    doctrine of direct worker 
            control of capital
    synergism    belief that human will and             divine spirit cooperate in 
            salvation

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Overparenting : Being excessively protective of one's children in order to guarantee their safety and ensure their success in life.
    Outernet : Traditional media (newpapers, magazines, radio, television) as opposed to the internet.

     

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 
    Born to the purple
    Someone who is born to the purple is born in a royal or aristocratic family. ("Born in the purple" is also used.)
    Bread and circuses
    Activites that entertain people and distract them from problems to keep them from complaining or protesting are bread and circuses.
    Cog in the machine
    A person who does an unimportant job in a large company or organisation is a cog in the machine.
    Drag your heels
    If you drag your heels, you either delay doing something or do it as slowly as possible because you don't want to do it.
    Easy as falling off a log
    Something very easy or simple to do is as easy as falling off a log.

    INTERESTING PHRASES

    to move in - a) [for someone] to come to reside in something or some place. I moved into a new apartment last week. When did the new family move in?
    b)  to enter something or some place. The whole party moved into the house when it started raining. c) to begin a new line of activity. After failing at real estate, he moved into house painting. 
     to hang around - to loiter idly about.  to spend time in a place waiting or doing nothing
    I hung around outside, waiting for the others.
     to show someone round-   to lead someone around a place for the first time,so that they can see all parts of it. I'll get someone to show you around the house.

    Tongue Twister

    Dozens of Dogs Dive Down Deep
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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Posted Date : 17-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Human capital - The health, strength, education, training, and skills which people bring to their jobs.  
    Human resources - The quantity and quality of human effort directed toward producing goods and services (also called labor). 
    Incentives - Factors that motivate and influence the behavior of households and businesses.  Prices, profits, and losses act as incentives for participants to take action in a market economy.  

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Solar energy: First realistic application of solar energy using parabolic solar reflector to drive caloric engine on steam boiler, John Ericsson, U.S., 1860s.
    Solar system, universe: (Sun-centered universe) Nicolaus Copernicus, Warsaw, 1543; (establishment of planetary orbits as elliptical) Johannes Kepler, Germany, 1609; (infinity of universe) Giordano Bruno, Italian monk, 1584.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    collectivism    doctrine of communal con        trol of means of production
    collegialism    theory that church is inde        pendent from the state
    conceptualism    theory that universal         truths  exist as mental         concepts

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
     Funemployment: A blend of 'fun' and 'unemployed'. Someone who enjoys not having a job because they have more time for leisure and fun activities.

    PROVERBS

    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    empty vessels make the most noise
     people who are the least intelligent are often the loudest and talk the most The man talked endlessly but he never knew much about what he was saying. He was a good example that empty vessels make the most noise. 
    he who pays the piper calls the tune
     the person who pays for something should co trol how it is spent or used The oil company was paying the expenses for the theater group. However, he who pays the piper calls the tune and they wanted to help decide which plays would be performed. 
    it takes all kinds (to make a world)
    different people like different things The woman was wearing very strange clothes. It seems that it takes all kinds to make a world. 
    JK Proverbs
    jump out of the frying pan and into the fir  to leave one dangerous or bad situation for a situation that is worse My friend jumped out of the frying pan and into the fire. He changed jobs and had more problems in his new job than in his old one. 

    Tongue Twister
    Silly Snakes Slither Through The Sand 
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 16-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Taxes - Required payments of money made to governments by households and business firms.  
    Tariff - A tax on an imported good.  
    Total cost - Cost of resources used in producing a product multiplied by the quantity produced.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Jet propulsion: (engine) Sir Frank Whittle, England, Hans von Ohain, Germany, 1936; (aircraft) Heinkel He 178, 1939.
    Kinetic theory of gases: (molecules of a gas are in a state of rapid motion) Daniel Bernoulli, Switzerland, 1738.
    Laser:  (theoretical work on) Charles H. Townes, Arthur L. Schawlow, U.S., N. Basov, A. Prokhorov,  U.S.S.R., 1958; (first working model) T. H. Maiman, U.S., 1960.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    accidentalism    theory that events do             not have causes
    acosmism    disbelief in existence of                    eternal universe distinct from     God.
    adevism    denial of gods of mythology             and legend

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Recessionista: Popular new term for a person who succeeds in dressing stylishly on a tight budget.
    Ringtone: The sound made by a mobile or cell phone to indicate an incoming call.

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 

    Break a leg
    This idiom is a way of wishing someone good luck.
    Bull market
    A bull market is a period when investors are optimistic and there are expectations that good financial results will
    Closed book to me
    If a subject is a closed book to you, it is something that you don't understand or know anything about.
    Cloud nine
    If you are on cloud nine, you are extremely happy. ('cloud seven' is a less common alternative)
    Drop into your lap
    If something drops into your lap, you receive it suddenly, without any warning. ('Fall into your lap' is also used.)

    Names for Names

    acronym    word formed from initial letters of         another word
    allonym        other person's name used by an         author
    ananym        name written backward; often             used as synonym

    Collective Name  Animal

    barren        of    mules
    pack        of    mules
    rake        of    mules
    span        of    mules

    MANIA 

    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    hobomania    bums or beggars (Joke)
    hodomania    road travel
    heteromania    the opposite sex
    hieromania    priests or sacred things
    hippomania    horses (Better than 
        equinomania)

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 15-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Investment - The purchase of a security, such as a stock or bond.  
    Investment in capital resources - Business purchases of new plant and equipment.  
    Investment in human capital - An action taken to increase the productivity of workers.  These actions can include improving skills and abilities, education, health, or mobility of workers. 

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Vitamins: (hypothesis of disease deficiency) Sir F. G. Hopkins, Casimir Funk, England, 1912; (vitamin A) Elmer V. McCollum, M. Davis, U.S., 1912-1914; (vitamin B) McCollum, U.S., 1915-1916; (thiamin, B1) Casimir Funk, England, 1912; (riboflavin, B2) D. T. Smith, E. G. Hendrick, U.S., 1926; (niacin) Conrad Elvehjem, U.S., 1937; (B6) Paul Gyorgy, U.S., 1934; (vitamin C) C. A. Hoist, T. Froelich, Norway, 1912; (vitamin D) McCollum, U.S., 1922; (folic acid) Lucy Wills, England, 1933.
    Razor: (safety, successfully marketed) King Gillette, U.S., 1901; (electric) Jacob Schick, U.S., 1928, 1931.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    noumenalism    belief in existence of         noumena
    nullibilism    denial that the soul exists     in space
    numenism    belief in local deities or         spirits
    objectivism    doctrine that all reality is     objective

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Origin: mid 17th century: via late Latin from Greek sunastria, from sun- 'together' + astr, astr- 'star'.

    PROVERBS

    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    a stitch in time saves nine
     if you fix something or solve a problem imm diately you will save time later A stitch in time saves nine and it is better to spend some time becoming organized so that you will save time later. 
    too many cooks spoil the broth
     if too many people try to do something then often the job will not be done well There were four pe ple trying to fix the broken air conditioner but too many cooks spoil the broth and there were too many people to do a good job. 
    what is good for the goose is good for the gander
    what is good for one person should be good for another person as well If the small bedroom is good enough for me then it should also be good enough for my friend. What's good for the goose is good for the gander. 
    you can lead/take a horse to water but you can't make him drink
     you can give someone the opportunity to do something but you can't get him or her to do it if they do not want to The woman took her chi dren to the park but they were not interested in pla ing in the playground. You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink. 

    Collective Name   Animal

    flock    of    pigeons
    herd    of    yaks
     herd    of    zebras

    MANIA 

    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    achluomania     darkness
    acousticomania    noise
    acaromania    itching
    ablutomania    washing or bathing
    aceromania    sourness or sour things

    Tongue Twister

    Gnats are not now gnawing on the nuts at night.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
  •  


Posted Date : 14-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Total revenue - Selling price of a product multiplied by the quantity demanded.  
    Trade agreement - An international agreement on conditions of trade in goods and services.  

    Trade-off - Giving up some of one thing to get some of another thing.  
    Traditional economy - A mode of economic organization which borrows economic decisions made at an earlier time or by an earlier generation.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    parallelism    belief that matter and mind             don't interact but relate

    pejorism    severe pessimism

    perfectibilism    doctrine that humans capable         of becoming perfect

    perfectionism    doctrine that moral perfection         constitutes the highest value

     

    WORDS OF WISDOM
    Words with suffix 'sophy' and 'sopher' words have in common an etymological derivation from the Greek sophia, meaning 'wisdom'. They refer to an odd group of systems of knowledge and philosophical practices.
    hypnosophy    knowledge of phenomena relat        ing to sleep
    mysteriosophy    system of knowledge con            cerning secrets and mysteries
    morosophy    foolish pretence of wisdom
    misosophy    hatred of knowledge or wisdom

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 

    Better than a stick in the eye
    If something is better than a stick in the eye, it isn't very good, but it is better than nothing.
    Below the belt
    If someone says something that is cruel or unfair, it is below the belt, like the illegal punches in boxing.
    Catch someone red-handed
    If someone is caught red-handed, they are found doing something wrong or illegal.
    Come to heel
    If someone comes to heel, they stop behaving in a way that is annoying to someone in authority and start being obedient.
    Do their dirty work
    Someone who does someone's dirty work, carries out the unpleasant jobs that the first person doesn't want to do. Someone who seems to enjoy doing this is sometimes known as a 'henchman'.

    MANIA 
    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    eromania    love, love-making
    erotomania    the erotic, eroticism
    fibriomania    fever (See also febrimania)
    Francomania    things French (See also                 Gallomania, Galiomania)
    frigomania    cold or cold things

     

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Foodoir: A blend of 'food' and 'memoir'. An account of someone's life or personal experiences, with a strong emphasis on food, often including recipes and cookery advice.

    Words with a heart  
    set one's heart on -  to have as one's ambition to obtain; covet  
    take heart -  to become encouraged  

    Tongue Twister

    Quietly The Queen Quickly makes A Quilt 
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 13-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Earn - Receive payment (income) for productive efforts.  
    Economic growth - An increase in the total output of a nation over time.  Economic growth is usually measured as the annual rate of increase in a nation's real GDP.  
    Gross domestic product (GDP) - The value, expressed in dollars, of all final goods and services produced in a year.  
    Gross domestic product (GDP), real - GDP corrected for inflation.

    Exchange - Trading goods and services with others  for other goods and services or for money (also called trade).  When people exchange voluntarily, they expect to be better off as a result.  

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Television: (Iconoscope-T.V. camera table) Vladimir Zworykin, U.S., 1923, and also kinescope (cathode ray tube) 1928; (mechanical disk-scanning method) successfully demonstrated by J.L. Baird, Scotland, C.F. Jenkins, U.S., 1926; (first all-electric television image) Philo T. Farnsworth, U.S., 1927; (color, mechanical disk) Baird, 1928; (color, compatible with black and white) George Valensi, France, 1938; (color, sequential rotating filter) Peter Goldmark, U.S., first introduced, 1951; (color, compatible with black and white) commercially introduced in U.S., National Television Systems Committee, 1953.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    somatism    materialism
    terminism    doctrine that there is a time             limit for repentance
    thanatism    belief that the soul dies with             the body
    thnetopsychis mbelief that the soul                 dies with the body, to be reborn         on day of judgement

    PROVERBS

    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    speak of the devil (and he appears)
    a person appears just when you are talking about him or her We were in the coffee shop talking about our friend when, speak of the devil, he suddenly appeared. 
    the thought that counts
     the good intentions behind an action or a gift are more important than the action or the gift itself The present that the man bought for his wife was not very expensive but it was the thought that counts and his wife was very happy. 
    what goes around comes around
     justice will be served and you will get what youd serve What goes around comes around and it is wise to maintain good relations with the pe ple who you work with. 

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Freemale : A woman who is happy to stay single and independent so that she can do what she wants when she wants.

    Names for Names

    anonym        person whose name is not given;         pseudonym
    antonym    word whose meaning is the oppo        site of a given word
    aptronym    name that suits its owner
    autonym    a writer's real name; work pub            lished under writer's own name

     

    Tongue Twister

    Young Yaks Like Yellow Yards
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 12-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Goods - Objects that can satisfy people's wants.  
    Government - National, state and local agencies that use tax revenues to provide goods and services for their citizens.  
    Households - Individuals and family units which, as consumers, buy goods and services from firms and, as resource owners, sell or rent productive resources to business firms.

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries

    Disease: (chemicals in treatment of) crusa ed by Philippus Paracelsus, 1527-1541; (germ theory) Louis Pasteur, France, 1862-1877.
    DNA: (deoxyribonucleic acid) Friedrich Meischer, Germany, 1869; (determination of double-helical structure) F. H. Crick, England and James D. Watson, U.S., 1953.
    Dye: (aniline, start of synthetic dye industry) William H. Perkin, England, 1856.

    WORDS OF WISDOM

    Words with suffix 'sophy' and 'sopher' words have in common an etymological derivation from the Greek sophia, meaning 'wisdom'. They refer to an odd group of systems of knowledge and philosophical practices.
    demonosopher    one who is inspired by             a demon or devil
    gastrosopher    a person skilled in matters of     eating
    gymnosophy    deep contemplation per            formed while naked

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    nihilism    denial of all reality; extreme     scepticism

    nominalism    doctrine that naming         of things defines reality

    nomism        view that moral con                duct consists in obser            vance of laws

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 

    Bite your tongue
    If you bite your tongue, you refrain from speaking because it is socially or otherwise better not to.
    Bits and bobs
    Bits and bobs are small, remnant articles and things- the same as 'odds and ends'.
    Come what may
    If you're prepared to do something come what may, it means that nothing will stop or distract you, no matter how hard or difficult it becomes.
    Drop the ball
    If someone drops the ball, they are not doing their job or taking their responsibilities seriously enough and let something go wrong.

    MANIA 

    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    electromania        electricity
    eleutheromania        freedom
    emetomania        vomiting
    enetomania        pins
    enissomania        attack or criticism
    enochlomania        crowds

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Flame wa: A period during which angry or rude email messages are exchanged.

    Tongue Twister
    Naughty Norman Never Naps at Night
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 11-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Monetary policy - The objectives of the central bank in exercising its control over money, interest rates, and credit conditions.  The instruments of monetary policy are primarily open-market operations, reserve requirements, and the discount rate.  
    Money - Anything that is generally accepted as a medium of exchange with which to buy goods and services, a good that can be used to buy all other goods and services, that serves as a standard of value, and has a store of value. 

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Thermodynamics: (first law: energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted from one form to another) Julius von Mayer, Germany, 1842; James Joule, England, 1843; (second law: heat cannot of itself pass from a colder to a warmer body) Rudolph Clausius, Germany, 1850; (third law: the entropy of ordered solids reaches zero at the absolute zero of temperature)Walter Nernst, Germany, 1918.
    Tire, pneumatic: Robert W. Thompson, England, 1845; (bicycle tire) John B. Dunlop, Northern Ireland, 1888.

    Words with a heart  

    lose one's heart to  - to fall in love with  
    near or close to one's heart  - cherished or important  

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    dualism    doctrine that the universe is             controlled by one good and             one evil force.
    diphysitism    belief in the dual nature of             Christ
    ditheism    belief in two equal gods, one         good and one evil

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    pretty is as pretty does
     you should do pleasant things if you want pe ple to think that you are pleasant Pretty is as pretty does, I said to my friend and suggested that he should be more pleasant if he wants pe ple to like him. 

    sticks and stones may break my bones but names/words will never hurt me
    verbal insults will not physically hurt a person The little boy yelled "sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me," when the older boy started to call him bad names. 
    there is no accounting for taste
     it is difficult to understand why somebody likes something There is no accounting for taste I thought as I looked at the man in the red pants and the green shoes.

    MANIA 
    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    illyngomania        vertigo
    insectomania        insects
    iomania            poison
    Islamomania        Islam
    isolomania        solitude, being alone
    isopteromania        termites

    Buzz Words

    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    synastry  [mass noun] Astrology compar son between the horoscopes of two or more people in order to determine their likely co patibility and relationship.

    Names for Names

    eponym    p    ersonal name from which anoth            er name is derived
    euonym    a     pleasing or beautiful name
    euonymous    appropriately named

    Tongue Twister

    Wayne went to Wales to watch walruses.
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 10-Jul-2018
  • Economics Terminology  
    Capital - All buildings, equipment and human skills used to produce goods and services.  
    Consumers - People whose wants are satisfied by consuming a good or a service.  
    Corporation - A legal entity owned by stockholders whose liability is limited to the value of their stock.  
    Criteria - Standards or measures of value that people use to evaluate what is most important. 

     

    Collective Name  Animal
    route        of    wolves
    warren        of    wombats
     fall        of    woodcocks
    descent        of    woodpeckers

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Steamship: Claude de Jouffroy d'Abbans, France, 1783; James Rumsey, U.S., 1787; John Fitch, U.S., 1790; (high-pressure) Oliver Evans, U.S., 1804. All preceded Robert Fulton, U.S., 1807, credited with launching first commercially successful steamship.

    Stethoscope: René Laënnec, France, 1819.

    Sulfa drugs: (parent compound, para-aminobenzenesulfanomide) Paul Gelmo, Austria, 1908; (antibacterial activity) Gerhard Domagk, Germany, 1935.
    Superconductivity: (theory) John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, John Scheiffer, U.S., 1957.

    PHILOSOPHICAL ISMS

    Each word with a suffix 'ism' represents a philosophical, political or moral doctrine or a belief system.
    resistentialism        humorous theory that             inanimate objects dis            play malice towards                 humans
    romanticism        belief in sentimental                 feeling in artistic                 expression
    substantialism        belief that there is a                 real existence under                lying phenomena

    An idiom a day, keeps  confusion away 

    Ants in your pants
    If someone has ants in their pants, they are agitated or excited about something and can't keep still.
    Broken record
    When someone sounds like a broken record, they keep on repeating the same things. ('Stuck record' is also used.)
    Clean sheet
    When someone has a clean sheet, they have got no criminal record or problems affecting their reputation. In football and other sports, a goalkeeper has a clean sheet when let no goals in.
    Dull as ditchwater
    (UK) If something is as dull as ditchwater, it is incredibly boring. A ditch is a long narrow hole or trench dug to containwater, which is normally a dark, dirty colour and stagnant (when water turns a funny colour and starts to smell bad). (In American English,'things are 'dull as dishwater'.)

    MANIA 

    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    canceromania    cancer (Better: carcinomania)
    carcinomania    cancer (Preferable to cancero            mania)
    cardiomania    heart, the
    carnomania    meatBuzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
      Funemployment : A blend of 'fun' and 'unemployed'. Someone who enjoys not having a job because they have more time for leisure and fun activities.

    Tongue Twister
     It didn't faze the thief to thieve in my face
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

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Posted Date : 09-Jul-2018
  • General Medical Experts
    There are different types of doctors who treat various medical conditions according to their specialization.
    Cardiac Electrophysiologist ~ Monitors and treats electrical activity of the heart and abnormal heart rhythm.

    Nuclear Cardiologist ~ Implements techniques related to nuclear medicine for diagnosing and treating various cardiac diseases.


    Collective Name  Animal
     sowse    of    lions
    troop    of    lions
    lounge    of    lizards
     herd    of    llamas
    plague    of    locusts

    A Guide to Inventions and Discoveries
    Conservation of electric charge: (the total electric charge of the universe or any closed system is constant) Benjamin Franklin, U.S., 1751-1754.
    Contagion theory: (infectious diseases caused by living agent transmitted from pe son to person) Girolamo Fracastoro, Italy, 1546.
    Cells: (word used to describe microscopic examination of cork) Robert Hooke, England, 1665; (theory: cells are common structural and functional unit of all living organisms) Theodor Schwann, Matthias Schleiden, 1838-1839.

    PROVERBS
    proverb - is a saying that makes a truth or piece of wisdom easier to remember e.g. a stitch in time saves nine 
    pot calls the kettle black
    someone criticizes somebody for a fault that they have themselves My friend always crit cizes me for being late but that is like the pot calling the kettle black. He himself is the one who is usually late. 
    spare the rod and spoil the child
    sometimes you must physically punish a child in order to teach him or her to behave properly The parents supported some physical punis ment for their children and believed that if you spare the rod you will spoil the child. 

    these things are sent to try us
    some difficulties appear in order to test our courage or patience The woman had very strong religious beliefs and although she faced many difficulties, she believed that those things were sent to try her and she continued on. 

    MANIA 
    (Uncontrolled obsession is called mania)
    neopharmamania    new drugs
    neomania    anything new
    nephomania    clouds
    noctimania    the night (Better nyctomania)
    nomatomania    names

    Buzz Words
    Recently-coined new words in English,  terms and expressions with their meaning. 
    Haycation :  A holiday or vacation spent on a farm.
    Hacktivist : A person who manipulates information on the internet in order to transmit a message, usually political.

    Tongue Twister
    Film Franny Flying Forward To France
    (Repeat it loudly a few times to check   if you could say it fast, without a slip)

    ...
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